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Chris Marrow

Dear Debbie,

Can you please give me some information? I am building an outdoor arena in Scotland!! The bottoming is demolition rubble, which is very deep as we filled a low-lying field. It will be a problem to drive in posts, as we will encounter slabs on the way down. We'll probably have to use a hammer drill attached to a JCB digger to make holes and cement in the posts. My question is how long should the 4x4 fence posts be, how much above ground and how much below ground? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Chris Morrow

Chris Marrow

Hi Chris,

How wonderful, and in Scotland! I hope you can send some pictures when you are done. The depth of posts depends on two things: one, how cold it gets in your area (frost depths) and two, how tall you would like your rail in your riding arena. If you are using our Flex-Fence, corner posts or posts on a sweeping corner, must be concreted. We suggest 6" round posts by 9' length. Your post will go 4' in the ground, and the concrete depth will be determined by the frost depths (installation instructions can be downloaded from our website).

If you are looking at a 5' post height, then we suggest 4"x8' for line posts, going 3 ft. in the ground. The taller your posts, the further in the ground you should put them. If you want a shorter height, you may be able to go half a foot less in the ground (again depending on frost depths). If you only intend on riding in your area, you may not need a tall fence and would be fine with a 4' height. I personally have hunter jumpers and western horses and prefer the 5' height. I never know if I may have company with horses that need a field, and the arena would work.

Be sure you cover your base with a good, solid heavy dirt. Make sure you tamp it, or give it time to settle so that you can get a level base. Your footing may be anywhere between 3-6" depending on your discipline; 3-4" is usually average. Please let me know if I can be of any further help, and have fun with your project.

Debbie

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