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Christine D.

Dear Debbie,

Please post this for everyone to read about barbed wire fence. My horse, Prieta, and several of our other horses were boarded with other horses at a pasture with barbed wire fence. Prieta got into a fight with a horse and they ran into a fence. Prieta sustained a very serious injury to her hind leg, which required 101 stitches!! To make the matter worse, she has never walked normally again, ever. She has this very funny way of walking. Whenever a horse walks, their legs move with hooves from one spot to another; pick up the hoof move a low arch and put down hoof; then another leg moves, pick up the hoof move a low arch and put down hoof. Now, Preita's way of walking is bizarre at best, very, very high arch when she moves her hoof and you can feel her hoof hitting her stomach sometimes. It is all due to barbed wire fence. Christine

Christine D.

Hi Christine,

Thanks so much for sharing your experience, as awful as it was for you and Prieta. At RAMM, we are always looking for safer fencing alternatives for horses. Barbed wire is widely used, but can cut a horse so easily, and the vet bill may amount to more than the cost of the fence. Smooth wire, which was originally intended for use with cattle, is also used frequently for horses. However, horses do not have the tough hides that cattle do, and they can be injured badly on a smooth wire fence.

For people with an existing fence that they may not be able to replace right away, we often recommend adding a strand of electric and/or a wider top sight rail to improve control and visibility. Options like our Flex-Fence or Pro-Tek Electric Tape work well. Ultimately, fence constructed of four rails of 5" High Impact Flex-Fence will probably be one of the strongest and among the safest ways to contain horses.

Debbie

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