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Dawn O.

Dear Debbie,

We are looking seriously at using the V-Mesh fence for our horses. We live in a suburban area that used to be country and is now surrounded by the city and homes. We need a fence that will keep out dogs, children, etc., and keep in our horses. It also needs to be low-maintenance. Our property is slightly rolling - not flat, but not hilly either. How does this fence work when you are not on a flat piece of ground? Also, how do you install it? We have wooden fence posts up already. Do we need bracing for the end posts? I appreciate your help. Dawn

Dawn O.

Hi Dawn,

It sounds like you are in a growing, popular area. I understand your situation. Wire mesh works well to keep animals in and others out. Rolls of mesh fencing are quite heavy, so if you are installing it yourself for the first time, you may need help.

When installed, wire mesh will stretch across slightly rolling areas. However, the fence will not meet the ground in areas where there are inclines and declines, and terminations may be necessary. Take your fence to the edge of the incline or decline, terminate and brace, then continue on to the next incline or decline. You will need to brace ends and corners as well as inclines or declines that require terminating.

Posts should be set 8 or 10 feet apart. This fence needs to be tensioned. Most often a top rail of flex rail or board is used along with mesh fence. This helps to stop "scallops" on the top of the mesh caused by horses leaning over the fence and pushing down (electric on top may be also be an option for you). Mesh fence is not made with "memory" in the wire, so any heavy pressure to it creates a "dent" in the fence.

Remember, proper installation is the key to any fence system. All the good aspects of wire mesh, such as keeping out predators, non-climbable containment, little maintenance, and top to ground containment make it a good choice for many horse owners. Please let me know how I can further help you.

Debbie

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