How Do You Brace Fence Posts?

Bracing your fence posts is a step many people skip and is a reason why so many people have collapsing ​or failing containment systems. There are many things you'll need to consider, such as frost depth, soil type, bracing technique, etc. We do not recommend twitch wire or H-bracing techniques. Here are some rules of thumb for post depth:


  • Line Post Holes - should be approximately 24-36” deep.
  • End/Corner Posts Holes - should be 36-48” deep depending on frost line. Fill the hole with concrete to approximately 4” below ground level. Make sure that the bottom of the hole​ is at least 6” wider than the top of the hole.
  • Diagonal Brace Post Holes - should be at a minimum of 18” deep with an 18” squared face. The hole must extend below your frost line and be 70” from the end/corner post hole (center to center). Connect your brace post and end/corner post together with a diagonal brace plate.


When filling your fence post holes with concrete, please keep the following in mind so you aren’t replacing posts or fencing down the road:


• Fill to within 4” of the ground level so you can put the dirt back in around your posts and grass will grow. 

• Lean upright fence posts back approximately 1” away from the fence’s tension. 

• Make sure your diagonal braces are in the footer no more than 3-4 inches or they could push through the concrete when tension is applied. 

• Make sure all concreted holes are below the frost line for your area.

• Make sure your upright fence posts are correct with your string line. All of the string lines should be on the outside of your corners; remember, your string line represents your fence.


*Note: ​The most efficient way to dig holes for your fence posts are with a 12" diameter, 48" long auger. Before you drill, call local utilities (dial 811) to mark your utility lines.

 

You can read more about how to properly brace your Flex Fence® in this article or the Flex Fence® installation instructions. If you have any unanswered questions, please contact a RAMM expert so your horse fencing will last for years!


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